The Combined Importance of Your Core and Pelvic Floor

As a pre and post-natal exercise specialist it is my job (or at least I see it that way!) to check the condition of each new clients’ deep core muscles and pelvic floor strength. This assessment tells me exactly where to start with our training journey together and if further assistance may be needed, in the way of a women’s health physiotherapist.

DSC_3525Why am I writing about the pelvic floor when there are other fitness tips I could be sharing? Because I passionately believe that people are greatly undereducated in the role of the core and pelvic floor. If your pelvic floor is not functioning well, this can and does massively affect one’s confidence and overall sense of self. We’re talking about a matter of continence and confidence. — Imagine having the constant worry that if you laugh, cough or sneeze you will not be able to control ‘down there’ and leak a little/pee yourself. This is a regular occurrence for many, because these natural functions of the body put pressure on the core and pelvic floor. If your pelvic floor muscles are weakened for whatever reason, this can easily happen. Many women I have spoken to nod their head in recognition of this and think it’s just normal after having a baby. Well listen up all, you CAN change this.

The pelvic floor comes under a large amount of stress through pregnancy and giving birth. NOTE; NOT just vaginal birth but caesarean deliveries too. Believe me, I know from having a caesarean myself. It isn’t just at this time though; also during the menopause, post hysterectomy and similar invasive surgical procedures. Men can also suffer from the side effects of a lack of conditioning of these deep, internal muscles e.g. from acute IBS or digestive issues as well as heavy weight training.

I have a great book called ‘Pelvic Floor Secrets’ by Jenny Russell, which I have not yet finished but have already learned a great deal from the first half. This information benefits both my clients and me, therefore I recommend this book to anyone experiencing/familiar with sub-optimal pelvic floor function.

Another useful bit of advice is to really think about your breath. Focus on what you feel internally when you exhale deeply. Whether you can feel it or not, (this will come if you continue to practice) this action connects to the deep core musculature and pelvic floor.

I am no longer surprised, yet still disappointed to hear from the new Mums that I train, that in their post-natal check up, they have been given the go-ahead to exercise with no actual physical ‘check’. As a result many women are sent away ready to train without knowing that they are already starting on the back foot. Pelvic floor and core connection and re-strengthening is fundamental before doing sprints/burpees or whatever high impact exercise one wants to do to help shift excess fat. Not only will results be hindered, but these problems left untreated could cause further damage if expert advice is not sought. I’ve seen too many ladies with abdominal separation, and continence issues training unwisely (for healing their body after giving birth), so please speak up if this is you, so you can feel better in more ways than one!

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